Community Events Calendar

To submit an event, email details to Ann Erickson. This calendar is provided as a service to the Greater Seattle community. Listing of an event does not imply sponsorship or endorsement by the Church Council of Greater Seattle.

Jan
18
Thu
Save the Date: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity
Jan 18 – Jan 25 all-day

Christians across traditions and denominations and around the world come together to celebrate the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, traditionally celebrated between January 18 – 25 between the feasts of St. Peter and St. Paul. The theme for the week of prayer in 2018 is “Your right hand, O Lord, glorious in power” is inspired by Exodus 15:6. The resources for the week have been prepared by members of different churches in the Caribbean. Find resources.

Jan
23
Tue
A Three-Part Series on Islam @ Cathedral Hall
Jan 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Immigrant Assistance & Social Outreach and Advocacy at St. James Cathedral present “A Three-Part Series on Islam” Tuesdays, January 16th, 23rd, and 30th from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at Cathedral Hall.

For anyone interested in learning about Islam. Explore the history of Islam, how it has been and continues to be part of the American fabric, the intersection with Christianity, modern day Islam, and Islamophobia.

Presenters:

Dr. Erica Martin, Seattle University,  on Abrahamic Inheritance: Continuity and Difference in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on January 16th

Aneelah Afzali, ED of MAPS-AMEN on Islam today, Islamophobia, Islam and women, and responding to people who are hostile to Muslims on January 23rd   

Laila Almounaier, MAPS on Muslims as part of the American Fabric, and the History of Islam on January 30th

Information: Christopher Koehler at 206-382-4511 or ckoehler@stjames-cathedral.org

Jan
26
Fri
First Annual Peacemaking Summit @ Seattle University Student Center, Rm. 160
Jan 26 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

A celebration and acknowledgement of the power of partnerships relating to the peacemaking circles movement in King County. Coordinated by the King County Peacemaking Coordinating Team (kingcountypct.org).

Peacemaking Circles are a process to heal the community. It is the way of decision making that comes from the Tagish and Tlingit First Nations people from the Yukon territories of Canada. It was brought to the King County juvenile system by Saroeum Phoung.

Parking You can park in the large parking deck off of James St. on the Seattle University property. That will be easy to access the Student Center. The bottom floor is for visitors. After parking, take the elevator up to the skyway and walk across the skyway. You will be in the Student Center!

After arriving in the student center, you will be on the third floor. Take the steps down to the 1st floor or one of the two sets of elevators in the building.

Donations are welcomed. Please make your tax-deductible donation to Church Council of Greater Seattle, PO Box 18467, Seattle WA 98118. On the memo line, notate Peacemaking.

Please send questions to YCC-Chaplain@thechurchcouncil.org

Jan
27
Sat
Ancora presents “Sacred Night” @ Green Lake Church of Seventh Day Adventists
Jan 27 @ 7:30 pm
Ancora presents "Sacred Night" @ Green Lake Church of Seventh Day Adventists | Seattle | Washington | United States

Seattle women’s choir Ancora, directed by Interim Artistic Director Freddie Coleman, accompanied by Justin Hansen, and joined by guest artists Resonance Handbell Quartet, unveils “Sacred Night,” a seasonal winter program. This program features a Gregorian-inspired “Magnificat” and “Nunc Dimittis” by Frank La Rocca, “Mass No. 6” by Romanian-born Hungarian György Orbán, and the mystical “Northern Lights” written for treble voices, handbells, and tuned glasses by Latvian Ēriks Ešenvalds. The program may be heard twice:

Saturday, January 27, 7:30pm at Green Lake Church of Seventh Day Adventists (6350 East Green Lake Way North, Seattle, WA 98103 – tickets here)
Sunday, January 28, 4:30pm at the Church of the Holy Cross (11526 162nd Ave NE, Redmond, WA 98052 – tickets here)

$13 general admission, $11 seniors, students admitted free with valid student ID (or $16/$13/free at the door)

Jan
28
Sun
Faith Over Fear: Empowering Faith Leaders to Combat Islamophobia @ Muslim Association of Puget Sound
Jan 28 – Jan 30 all-day

Does your congregation ask questions that you can’t answer about Islam and Muslims? Do you want to be an effective ally for your Muslim neighbors? Do you want to have the right tools and training to combat the rising threat of Islamophobia? If so, then this conference is for you.

National and local experts and practitioners will facilitate this training to educate, network and equip faith leaders to better advocate against a narrative of fear and divisiveness in our country.

This training is for Rabbis, Pastors, Ministers, and Imams of faith communities as well as leaders, coordinators, and organizers of regional faith and interfaith organizations and partnerships. Training modules will cover the following: basics of Islam and Islamophobia; how the rise in Islamophobia threatens us all; who American Muslims are; how to locate and address our fears; how to respond to common misconceptions and questions about Islam and Muslims; strategies for faith communities to make effective change; how to unite on messaging; media training.

What Does Justice Look Like? @ Seattle Mennonite Church
Jan 28 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

The 2018 Seattle Mennonite Peace Lecture. What does justice look like? The struggles for liberation in Indigenous homelands. Speakers Wazitayawin and John Stoesz will bring the experience of the Dakota struggle for land justice in Minnesota, and explore its application for communities of the Pacific Northwest.

10:30 a.m. morning session at Seattle Mennonite
“Naming Injustice to Find Justice” Wazitayawin and John Stoesz’ question for settler communities is: What does it mean to benefit from genocide, forced removal and stolen land? What is a justice response?

2:30 p.m. afternoon session at Duwamish Longhouse (4705 W. Marginal Way SW)
“What is the Posture of Solidarity?” The mantra of Mennonite Central Committee’s Indigenous Visioning Circle is “to identify and resource Indigenous strength and genius while staying on the path of relationship and decolonization.” How is this path put into practice?

More info

Waziyatawin is a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist from the Pezihutazizi Otunwe (Yellow Medicine Village) in southwestern Minnesota.  She earned her PhD in American History from Cornell University and has held tenured positions at Arizona State University and the University of Victoria where she also served as the Indigenous Peoples Research Chair in the Indigenous Governance Program. Waziyatawin has been working for Upper Sioux’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office since 2016, serving as the THP Officer in 2016-17, conducting traditional cultural property surveying and monitoring work, and most recently, completing a major history project for her community. She is also Executive Director of the Dakota nonprofit Makoce Ikikcupi, a reparative justice project supporting Dakota reclamation of homeland. Committed to sustainability and simplicity, she is been experimenting with these concepts in her personal life. She is the author or co/editor of six volumes, including What Does Justice Look Like? The Struggle for Liberation in Dakota Homeland (Living Justice Press, 2008) and For Indigenous Minds Only: A Decolonization Handbook (SAR Press, 2012), edited with Michael Yellow Bird.

John Stoesz spent 30 years working in program and executive director roles for faith based agencies. These include the Dallas Peace Center, Greater Dallas Community of Churches, Metropolitan Christian Council of Philadelphia, Mennonite Central Committee Central States and Camp Mennoscah. He now devotes much of his time to two passions: riding his recumbent tricycle and Native American justice. Minnesota is his home state and Mountain Lake is his hometown. In 2012 his family sold his grandparents farm near Mountain Lake. Since this was Dakota homeland before white settlement, he donated half the sale amount from his portion to Native groups working for land justice. Most went to Makoce Ikikcupi (Land Recovery in the Dakota language). In 2013 he pedaled his trike 2,000 miles through 40 Minnesota counties to raise awareness about Dakota land return. He continues to spend significant time on awareness raising and fundraising among white people about colonization, decolonization, solidarity and reparations. He is a member of the Dismantling the Doctrine of Discovery Coalition – a network of Mennonites working to undo this horrible injustice.

What Does Justice Look Like? Part II @ Duwamish Longhouse
Jan 28 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm

The 2018 Seattle Mennonite Peace Lecture. What does justice look like? The struggles for liberation in Indigenous homelands. Speakers Wazitayawin and John Stoesz will bring the experience of the Dakota struggle for land justice in Minnesota, and explore its application for communities of the Pacific Northwest.

10:30 a.m. morning session at Seattle Mennonite
“Naming Injustice to Find Justice” Wazitayawin and John Stoesz’ question for settler communities is: What does it mean to benefit from genocide, forced removal and stolen land? What is a justice response?

2:30 p.m. afternoon session at Duwamish Longhouse (4705 W. Marginal Way SW)
“What is the Posture of Solidarity?” The mantra of Mennonite Central Committee’s Indigenous Visioning Circle is “to identify and resource Indigenous strength and genius while staying on the path of relationship and decolonization.” How is this path put into practice?

More info

Waziyatawin is a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist from the Pezihutazizi Otunwe (Yellow Medicine Village) in southwestern Minnesota.  She earned her PhD in American History from Cornell University and has held tenured positions at Arizona State University and the University of Victoria where she also served as the Indigenous Peoples Research Chair in the Indigenous Governance Program. Waziyatawin has been working for Upper Sioux’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office since 2016, serving as the THP Officer in 2016-17, conducting traditional cultural property surveying and monitoring work, and most recently, completing a major history project for her community. She is also Executive Director of the Dakota nonprofit Makoce Ikikcupi, a reparative justice project supporting Dakota reclamation of homeland. Committed to sustainability and simplicity, she is been experimenting with these concepts in her personal life. She is the author or co/editor of six volumes, including What Does Justice Look Like? The Struggle for Liberation in Dakota Homeland (Living Justice Press, 2008) and For Indigenous Minds Only: A Decolonization Handbook (SAR Press, 2012), edited with Michael Yellow Bird.

John Stoesz spent 30 years working in program and executive director roles for faith based agencies. These include the Dallas Peace Center, Greater Dallas Community of Churches, Metropolitan Christian Council of Philadelphia, Mennonite Central Committee Central States and Camp Mennoscah. He now devotes much of his time to two passions: riding his recumbent tricycle and Native American justice. Minnesota is his home state and Mountain Lake is his hometown. In 2012 his family sold his grandparents farm near Mountain Lake. Since this was Dakota homeland before white settlement, he donated half the sale amount from his portion to Native groups working for land justice. Most went to Makoce Ikikcupi (Land Recovery in the Dakota language). In 2013 he pedaled his trike 2,000 miles through 40 Minnesota counties to raise awareness about Dakota land return. He continues to spend significant time on awareness raising and fundraising among white people about colonization, decolonization, solidarity and reparations. He is a member of the Dismantling the Doctrine of Discovery Coalition – a network of Mennonites working to undo this horrible injustice.

Ancora presents “Sacred Night” @ The Episcopal Church of the Holy Cross
Jan 28 @ 4:30 pm
Ancora presents "Sacred Night" @ The Episcopal Church of the Holy Cross | Redmond | Washington | United States

Seattle women’s choir Ancora, directed by Interim Artistic Director Freddie Coleman, accompanied by Justin Hansen, and joined by guest artists Resonance Handbell Quartet, unveils “Sacred Night,” a seasonal winter program. This program features a Gregorian-inspired “Magnificat” and “Nunc Dimittis” by Frank La Rocca, “Mass No. 6” by Romanian-born Hungarian György Orbán, and the mystical “Northern Lights” written for treble voices, handbells, and tuned glasses by Latvian Ēriks Ešenvalds. The program may be heard twice:

Saturday, January 27, 7:30pm at Green Lake Church of Seventh Day Adventists (6350 East Green Lake Way North, Seattle, WA 98103 – tickets here)
Sunday, January 28, 4:30pm at the Church of the Holy Cross (11526 162nd Ave NE, Redmond, WA 98052 – tickets here)

$13 general admission, $11 seniors, students admitted free with valid student ID (or $16/$13/free at the door)

Jan
29
Mon
At Risk of Deportation: A Speaker Series @ Fauntleroy Church, UCC
Jan 29 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
At Risk of Deportation: A Speaker Series @ Fauntleroy Church, UCC | Seattle | Washington | United States

A series of three simple dinners and programs around “At Risk of Deportation,” held on Mondays, January 22, 29, and February 5. Simple dinner at 6:30 p.m. (freewill donation); program at 7 p.m. Open to all; attend individual sessions or all three. Advance registration is encouraged through the church office: 206-932-5600 or jackie@fauntleroyucc.org.

Download a flier

Monday, January 22
Living in the Shadows: The Human Toll of Current Immigration Policy

Lonnie Tristan Renteria, executive director, clinical services, Puentes
An agency mobilizing mental health resources to help undocumented migrants and their families cope and flourish

Karen Gamez, University of Washington senior
An immigrant-rights advocate since high school now at risk of losing her DACA status

Monday, January 29
From Detention to Deportation: Who Ends Up at the Northwest Detention Center and What Happens to Them?

Deborah Cruz, volunteer coordinator, Advocates for Immigrants in Detention Northwest
An organization assisting and advocating for detained immigrants and their families at the Tacoma-based, for-profit detention center – with 1,575 beds, one of the largest in the U.S.

Janet Gwilym, managing attorney, Kids in Need of Defense
An organization representing unaccompanied immigrant and refugee children pro bono

Monday, February 5
Welcoming the Stranger: How Can Religious Institutions Help Those at Risk of Deportation?

Michael Ramos, executive director, Church Council of Greater Seattle
An organization convening and catalyzing communities and people of faith to create a world of justice, in part through support of refugees and immigrants facing unjust detention and deportation

Phillip Lienau, co-chair, steering committee, Sanctuary Hub at Saint Mark’s Cathedral
A project providing shelter and drawing other churches into its support network for people at risk of deportation

 

Jan
30
Tue
A Three-Part Series on Islam @ Cathedral Hall
Jan 30 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Immigrant Assistance & Social Outreach and Advocacy at St. James Cathedral present “A Three-Part Series on Islam” Tuesdays, January 16th, 23rd, and 30th from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at Cathedral Hall.

For anyone interested in learning about Islam. Explore the history of Islam, how it has been and continues to be part of the American fabric, the intersection with Christianity, modern day Islam, and Islamophobia.

Presenters:

Dr. Erica Martin, Seattle University,  on Abrahamic Inheritance: Continuity and Difference in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam on January 16th

Aneelah Afzali, ED of MAPS-AMEN on Islam today, Islamophobia, Islam and women, and responding to people who are hostile to Muslims on January 23rd   

Laila Almounaier, MAPS on Muslims as part of the American Fabric, and the History of Islam on January 30th

Information: Christopher Koehler at 206-382-4511 or ckoehler@stjames-cathedral.org